Posts Tagged ‘Publisher’s Weekly’

Review: Publisher’s Weekly likes Scenting the Dark

Publisher’s Weekly has reviewed Scenting the Dark and Other Stories. Whee!

Scenting the Dark and Other Stories Mary Robinette Kowal. Subterranean (<http://www.subterraneanpress.com>www.subterraneanpress.com), $25 (80p) ISBN 978-1-59606-267-2

Scenting the DarkCampbell Award–winner Kowal presents a broad spectrum of stories in her chapbook-slim first collection. The heartbreaking “Just Right,” in which a family struggles with a child’s strange behavior, isn’t speculative at all. “Death Comes but Twice” edges into dark fantasy, while blind perfumer Penn is stalked by an enormous predator in SF horror story “Scenting the Dark.” The deepest tale is “Some Other Day,” in which a young scientist struggles to undo the terrible consequences of her father’s well-meant work, while “Jaiden’s Weaver” is a sweet story about nurturing and caring for a creature others think deformed. Kowal’s stories don’t always plumb the depths of speculation or characters, but when they do the results are often stirring. This excellent introduction to her work is likely to make her new fans. (Nov.)

What we tried to do with this was to put together a miniature collection of the stories which are hard to find or have never been printed in physical form.  Which means that you are getting my very first published story, ever, “Just Right” all the way up through “Jaiden’s Weaver” which came out online earlier this year.

Oh, and an intro by John Scalzi.

Publishers Weekly starred review for Clockwork Phoenix 2

clockworkphoenix2-tpb-arcI got home from WisCon last night to a wonderful review of  Clockwork Phoenix 2: More Tales of Beauty and Strangeness, edited by Mike Allen.

Allen finds his groove for this second annual anthology of weird stories, selecting 16 wonderfully evocative, well-written tales. Marie Brennan’s thought-provoking “Once a Goddess” considers the fate of a goddess abruptly returned to mortality. Tanith Lee puts a stunning twist in the story of a morose prince in “The Pain of Glass.” Mary Robinette Kowal’s “At the Edge of Dying” describes a world where magic comes only to those at death’s door. In “Hooves and the Hovelof Abdel Jameela,” Saladin Ahmed tellsof a small village on the edge of a desert, a hermit and a woman who may be a witch. Each story fits neatly alongside the next, and the diversity of topics, perspectives and authors makes this cosmopolitan anthology a winner. (July)

via Fiction – 5/25/2009 – Publishers Weekly. (Scroll to the bottom)